Macallan Classic Cut Limited Edition 2017

Tradition and change

Macallan is one of the big names in the whisky world. I would wager that many a non-whisky drinker will know something about them, probably from either seeing a Macallan bottle perched on the top shelf of a local bar or reading some of the endless cavalcade of newsmedia articles about how a new record has been set for the most expensive whisky sold at auction. (This whisky is always a Macallan and the amount of money involved is always eye-wateringly high.)

macallan

But despite their extensive brand recognition it can be difficult to pin down Macallan’s identity. At times Macallan plays up tradition: with cutesy pictures of the historic Easter Elchies house (built circa 1700) on some labels, prominently-displayed age statements and a distinctly gentlemen-at-the-golfing-clubhouse vibe. This is not to say that Macallan is stuck in the past though. At other times Macallan is seemingly all about innovation: with special bottlings released in collaborations with artists and perfumers, the occasional psychedelic label (the Ernie Button edition) and a jam-packed schedule of interesting limited releases.

macallan house
Easter Elchie’s house – now go and look at the Macallan label!

This dual-identity makes it difficult to get to grips with Macallan and results from something that many whisky brands struggle with: the need to have one foot planted firmly in the past and simultaneously one eye focused on the future. As the world keeps turning, distilleries and their whiskies need to preserve their past but embrace change too. Not all change is necessarily good. For example, Macallan was an early adopter in the broader trend of replacing age statement whiskies with NAS alternatives – a move that has been criticised for hiding important information from the consumer. But some change certainly is good. For example, Macallan’s just-opened £140 million distillery and visitor centre reflects environmentally-focused architectural design, new technology in the stillroom and a top-class visitor experience. It is now Scotland’s biggest distillery in terms of output with a capacity of 15 million litres.

What can be said about Macallan whisky itself? It remains the third most sold single malt in the world and the older and limited Macallan releases sell for ever-increasing amounts in both the primary and secondary markets. However, some of their newer releases have received a mixed critical response and for the price of a premium bottle of Macallan a discerning whisky-drinker could probably pick up a couple of bottles of comparable quality from other distilleries.

The whisky I am reviewing today is the Classic Cut Limited Edition 2017. This bottling was released in autumn 2017 for the American domestic market though it can also be found online in the secondary market in other places. It is a NAS whisky and is bottled at 58.4%. It is exclusively matured in oak casks seasoned with Spanish Oloroso sherry. The colour is a gorgeous burnished copper and is natural from the casks.

macallandram

Nose: Buttered toast, rich crème caramel, oranges, walnuts, vanilla and raisins.

Palate: A little restrained at first but then baked red apples and luscious apricot comes to the fore, with well-rounded oak notes and a beautiful, unctuous mouthfeel. Mainly sweet but also a little bit spicy.

Finish: Long, lingering and intense- due to the high proof. The sweetness of the palate segues into some light bitterness.

I enjoyed it neat but a drop or two of water might open up those sweet flavours even more.

While it might be hard to pin down the brand identity of Macallan, ultimately it is the quality of the whisky that really counts. The whisky in the bottle speaks louder than any marketing drive or fancy packaging/label. Regardless of the ongoing tension between tradition and innovation, the past and the future, “good” change and “bad” change, it is clear the Macallan has produced an excellent whisky here: a comforting and warming dram that is perfect on a cold night.

16/20

Check the A Cheeky Dram scoring system here

Author: acheekydram

An Aussie lady exploring the world of Scotch

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