Scapa Distillery Reserve Collection

A wild windswept part of the world, and a distillery exclusive

Welcome whisky drinkers, I am back after a short hiatus!

Today I’ll be reviewing a whisky from a distillery located on the rugged Orkney Islands. You may have read my previous review of whiskies from Highland Park, but this will instead be a review of their nearby Orcadian compatriots at Scapa distillery.

Scapa was established in 1885 and is located just outside Kirkwall, a quick 5-10 minutes drive from Highland Park. The distillery is perched high up on the cliffs that surround the picturesque Scapa Flow and the distillery itself is a great vantage point for viewing the tumultuous swirl of waves through the bay. Apparently, this area was a very important naval base in both World Wars due to its strategic location. Many sunken wrecks of various warships now litter the surrounding seabed, hidden from view to all but the intrepid diver.

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Like many Scottish distilleries, Scapa has had its high and low points. Production ceased during World War II and the distillery was even mothballed at one stage (1994-2004). Refurbishments have since been carried out and the distillery and visitors centre were warm and welcoming during my visit to the Orkney Islands in mid-2017.

Currently Scapa produces ~1 million litres per year. A particularly interesting aspect of this process is their idiosyncratic use of a Lomond still as one of their two stills. Lomond stills look very different to the usual kind of still – they consist of a pot topped with a neck fitted with several plates, each of which can be turned on or off in order to imitate the effects of a still with a very short neck, a long neck or anything in between. These changes to the still shape consequently change the flavour profile of the spirit that the still produces. Lomond stills have now largely vanished from whisky production and only a handful remain in use in Scotland. Bruichladdich, for example, now uses their Lomond still to produce their “Botanist” gin. However, Scapa continues to use theirs for whisky and this is a rare treat indeed.

Scapa does not have a particularly large core range nor does it have much market presence in my home country of Australia. In recent years Scapa’s flagship bottling was a 16 Year Old but this has been discontinued and replaced by the NAS bottlings Skiren and Glansa. However, from time to time you can find a Scapa limited edition, often thematically linked to the naval history of the Scapa Flow area, or an independent bottling from brands like Gordon & McPhail or Douglas Laing. The particular bottle I am reviewing today is a distillery exclusive, so unless you fancy making the trek to Orkney you might need to cross you fingers that your go-to local or internet distributor gets some stock in.

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The Distillery Reserve Collection is a 12 Year Old bottled at cask strength – 58.5%. It was distilled 10 June 2003 and bottled 29 July 2015.  The high ABV is a welcome feature of this whisky.

Nose: Tropical fruits – pineapples and peaches. Bubblegum; really saccharine sweet. Definite hints of banana and toffee.

Palate: Crisp fresh pears. Vanilla. Light caramel. Cereal kind of notes – Weetbix with a generous spoonful of sugar and a splash of milk. Under-ripe almonds.

Finish: Although its not a short finish it is a little one-dimensional. More sweet caramel notes and some pleasing warmth.

Scapa dram

Conclusion: This is a nice whisky, quite straightforward and easy-drinking. The nose is very sweet and so is the palate but the palate gains some additional depth from its freshe fruit notes.

14/20

Check out the A Cheeky Dram scoring system here