Glenturret (G&M 1999/2018)

Whisky and stills and cats, oh my!

Do you like whisky? Do you like cats? If you’re anything like me then the answer is a resounding “Yes!” to both questions. The world would be immeasurably less enjoyable place if either delicious drams or furry feline friends were— *gulp*— absent from it. I have had held both whisky and cats close to my heart for some time but these loves occupy different parts of my life. Like parallel roads, whisky and cats run through the course of my life but never meet. Indeed, it never really occurred to me that they could intersect. How could this possibly even occur? Perhaps some kind of cat café, like the kind popularised in Japan, but which served whisky instead of tea alongside cat companionship? Perhaps a Maine Coon trained by search-and-rescue teams to carry miniature drams of whisky to lost travellers, akin to the barrel-carrying St Bernard dogs that historically worked in the Swiss Alps? It all seems a bit absurd. But then I found it: a point of intersection. The mediating middle of the Venn diagram where the circle “Love of Whisky” overlaps with the circle “Love of Cats”. Glenturret Distillery.

glenturret
Cold and crisp welcome to the distillery

Glenturret Distillery is located in the Southern Highlands and can be found amidst the rolling hillsides of Perthshire. Established in 1775, like many distilleries it has suffered from some stops-and-starts in production throughout the years. Glenturret might not be an immediately recognisable name to whisky drinkers as much of what it produces goes for blending and only recently have they begun to emphasise their single malt. In Australia we don’t get very much of this single malt either. The ownership of the distillery changed hands in late 2018, just a short time before our visit, so hopefully the new owners will make the Glenturret single malt more easily accessible down under.

The distillery itself is equipped with a stainless steel mash tun which, idiosyncratically, has an open top that exposes its contents to the elements and that requires stirring by hand (rather than by machine). This open mash tun is said to be the last remaining one of its kind in Scotland, which certainly explains why I have never seen its’ like in all my other distillery tours. The distillery also has eight Douglas fir washbacks and a pair of stills with vertical condensers. The stillroom is the heart of any distillery and the highlight of a tour. As you bask in the radiant heat from these copper giants you can’t help but wonder at the seemingly magical way they convert sugary wort into clear, concentrated spirit.

glenturret still
Magic of the still room

But I was broken free from their spell at Glenturret when I spied a very unusual addition to the stillroom: a small cat flap entry from the outside, complete with a tiny ramp for feline legs.

glen and turrets house
& what a glorious little house it is!

Whilst in Scotland you are spoilt for choice when it comes to planning your travel itinerary. There is simply so many great distilleries to visit but, as a tourist, only a limited amount of time. Careful planning is key and so is making some tough choices about where you have time to visit and where you do not. But how to choose between all the available distillery options? “We’re coming for your cats” I typed into the ‘comments’ section of the Glenturret tour booking webpage. “Sounds like a threat” my husband piped up. What I was trying to convey in my message was that the long, storied association between Glenturret distillery and their cats was the tipping point for choosing this particular distillery for inclusion on our latest Scottish roadtrip. I deleted the comment but I confirmed the booking.

The cats that I was “coming for”, the cats who benefit from the catflap into the warm and cozy stillroom, are Glen and Turret. They may be unusual brand ambassadors but they certainly appear to enjoy their visitor-meeting and marketing duties, indeed they each even have a special single-cask whisky named after them.

  To see a cat at a distillery is a welcome oddity in modern times but historically there would have been a more practical purpose for their presence. Given that whisky production requires huge amounts of barley, which distilleries in times past may have needed to stockpile at certain times, unwelcome visitors of the rodent variety would have plagued their premises. And who better to catch a rodent than a cat? Whilst Glen and Turret may no longer be needed to undertake these traditional mousing duties, the history of Glenturret includes a cat recognised in the Guinness Book of World Records as the most successful mouser of all time. Towser, a long-haired tortoiseshell cat, lived at the distillery from 1963 to 1987 and is estimated to have despatched a prodigious 28,899 mice during her tenure. Her impressive feat is immortalised in a statue erected near the stillroom as well as the merchandise bearing her proud (and somewhat scary) visage.

towser
A true legend of her time!

But let us put the cats of Glenturret aside for a minute in order to focus in on their whisky. The whisky I am reviewing today is an independent bottling from Gordon & Macphail of a Glenturret single malt, distilled in 1999 and bottled on 22 February 2018. It is a first fill sherry hogshead with an outturn of just 265 bottles at a cask strength of 51.6%.

confused merlot
Our own little resident cat

Nose: Fresh cherries, rose petals, cranberries, ripe red apple, walnut and a hint of milk chocolate

Palate: Immediate sweetness. Caramel slice, potpourri, pink grapefruit, lemon pith, a touch of oak and some quality nougat. A long finish with a viscous mouthfeel, ending in some slight aniseed notes.

An exceptional dram. One of the best I’ve tasted for a while. Restrained and complex but still approachable, at once elegant as well as a crowd-pleaser. Whilst the distillery’s cats may have lured me in their single malt is drawcard enough on its own.

17.5/20

Check out the A Cheeky Dram scoring system here

Author: acheekydram

An Aussie lady exploring the world of Scotch

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s