Glenmorangie The Original

No fuss, classic comfort dram

I’ve been a whisky fan for a good few years now and therefore tasted a wide variety of different drams. When seeking out my next whisky I usually find myself drawn to something exciting: waiting with bated breath for the latest expression releases, trawling through dusty bottleshop shelves and auction websites for the old and obscure, and salivating over weird and wonderful forms of maturation with their promise of unique flavours (ginger beer barrels, IPA barrels, or tequila barrels anyone?) However, there is something to be said for those whiskies that are familiar and reliable, even though their novelty may have long since worn off. Those work-horse drams that may not be flashy but that stock the shelves of most every bar, introduce new drinkers to the pleasures of single malt and provide a comforting “daily drinker” for their fans.

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The Original from Glenmorangie’s core range is just such a whisky. It is a straightforward and simple whisky, ubiquitous and relatively inexpensive.

The Original is matured for ten years entirely in bourbon casks, specifically first and second fill American white oak ex-bourbon casks. The Glenmorangie house style is already light and clean and this easy-drinking nature is accentuated by the Original’s 40% ABV. Glenmorangie typically injects additional complexity into their whiskies through the process of double-maturation, finishing some of their bourbon-matured whiskies in barrels that held port, sauternes, sherry, etc, but the Original dispenses with this kind of fuss. The result is a soft and floral dram, perfect for drinking either neat or as the base for a cocktail.

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Nose: Immediate malt and cereal notes that open up into tart pears and crisp green apples.

Palate: The promise of the nose delivers on the palate. Cereal notes followed again by fruit, but this time with some fresh banana added. It also develops some sweet and creamy notes, think vanilla icecream and orange sherbet.

Finish: Gentle but a little short, with a mellow malt flavour.

Glenmorangie’s The Original will not blow your socks off, especially if you are well-versed in whisky. But not all whiskies need to do this and admittedly this is not what this particular whisky was designed to do. Instead, this whisky delivers on being approachable, easy to drink, and elegant in its simplicity. It may not be something new, bold or bizarre, but it is a reliable whisky to keep on hand. Sometimes the comforting lullaby of the familiar is a welcome distraction from the siren song of the new.

13/20

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Macallan Classic Cut Limited Edition 2017

Tradition and change

Macallan is one of the big names in the whisky world. I would wager that many a non-whisky drinker will know something about them, probably from either seeing a Macallan bottle perched on the top shelf of a local bar or reading some of the endless cavalcade of newsmedia articles about how a new record has been set for the most expensive whisky sold at auction. (This whisky is always a Macallan and the amount of money involved is always eye-wateringly high.)

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But despite their extensive brand recognition it can be difficult to pin down Macallan’s identity. At times Macallan plays up tradition: with cutesy pictures of the historic Easter Elchies house (built circa 1700) on some labels, prominently-displayed age statements and a distinctly gentlemen-at-the-golfing-clubhouse vibe. This is not to say that Macallan is stuck in the past though. At other times Macallan is seemingly all about innovation: with special bottlings released in collaborations with artists and perfumers, the occasional psychedelic label (the Ernie Button edition) and a jam-packed schedule of interesting limited releases.

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Easter Elchie’s house – now go and look at the Macallan label!

This dual-identity makes it difficult to get to grips with Macallan and results from something that many whisky brands struggle with: the need to have one foot planted firmly in the past and simultaneously one eye focused on the future. As the world keeps turning, distilleries and their whiskies need to preserve their past but embrace change too. Not all change is necessarily good. For example, Macallan was an early adopter in the broader trend of replacing age statement whiskies with NAS alternatives – a move that has been criticised for hiding important information from the consumer. But some change certainly is good. For example, Macallan’s just-opened £140 million distillery and visitor centre reflects environmentally-focused architectural design, new technology in the stillroom and a top-class visitor experience. It is now Scotland’s biggest distillery in terms of output with a capacity of 15 million litres.

What can be said about Macallan whisky itself? It remains the third most sold single malt in the world and the older and limited Macallan releases sell for ever-increasing amounts in both the primary and secondary markets. However, some of their newer releases have received a mixed critical response and for the price of a premium bottle of Macallan a discerning whisky-drinker could probably pick up a couple of bottles of comparable quality from other distilleries.

The whisky I am reviewing today is the Classic Cut Limited Edition 2017. This bottling was released in autumn 2017 for the American domestic market though it can also be found online in the secondary market in other places. It is a NAS whisky and is bottled at 58.4%. It is exclusively matured in oak casks seasoned with Spanish Oloroso sherry. The colour is a gorgeous burnished copper and is natural from the casks.

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Nose: Buttered toast, rich crème caramel, oranges, walnuts, vanilla and raisins.

Palate: A little restrained at first but then baked red apples and luscious apricot comes to the fore, with well-rounded oak notes and a beautiful, unctuous mouthfeel. Mainly sweet but also a little bit spicy.

Finish: Long, lingering and intense- due to the high proof. The sweetness of the palate segues into some light bitterness.

I enjoyed it neat but a drop or two of water might open up those sweet flavours even more.

While it might be hard to pin down the brand identity of Macallan, ultimately it is the quality of the whisky that really counts. The whisky in the bottle speaks louder than any marketing drive or fancy packaging/label. Regardless of the ongoing tension between tradition and innovation, the past and the future, “good” change and “bad” change, it is clear the Macallan has produced an excellent whisky here: a comforting and warming dram that is perfect on a cold night.

16/20

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Auchentoshan Blood Oak

Light but not boring

Auchentoshan distillery is located in the Lowlands region, more specifically it lies somewhere in the gritty outskirts of Glasgow. This is not the most beautiful location; it lacks the charm of undulating green hills and gently burbling streams that surround other distilleries.

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But despite its industrial locale Auchentoshan nevertheless produces a light and very pure whisky. This is due to the triple distillation method that they employ to strip away some of the “heavier” notes from their whisky. The vast majority of Scottish distilleries just distil twice but Auchentoshan has gone down the path of triple distillation in order to create a more floral distillate that can be easily influenced by the oak during maturation.

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Ordinarily, lighter styles of whisky like this are not really my thing. I have tried a number of Auchentoshan whiskies in the past (Three Wood, American Oak, etc) and have been somewhat underwhelmed. But the Auchentoshan whisky I am reviewing today, the Blood Oak, is different. Despite Auchentoshan’s generally light character this particular whisky is intense: just bursting with juicy fruit and spice notes.

The Blood Oak is part of Auchentoshan’s Travel Retail Exclusive Range. I picked up a bottle during a stop-over in Changi Airport, Singapore, and I am glad that I did. In terms of technical information, the Blood Oak is a NAS whisky, bottled at 46% and has been matured in a combination of bourbon casks and red wine casks (hence the dramatic name). This maturation gives the whisky a very rich flavour. This is reflected in the deep red packaging of the bottle and the crimson gold colour of the whisky itself.

auch dram

Nose: Vanilla, creamed honey, citrus (blood orange and grapefruit), cloves and almond.

Palate: Juicy red fruits immediately come to the fore (plums, strawberries and summer raspberries), spicy notes of cloves and ginger, marzipan.

Palate: Peppery, long and lingering, with a little dryness at the end.

Blood Oak is the most rich, vibrant and complex of the Auchentoshan range that I have tried to date. I am enjoying the general whisky industry’s ongoing experimentation with different cask maturations/finishes and Auchentoshan’s combination of red wine and bourbon casks here is particularly well-matched. The sweet and vanilla flavours characteristic of bourbon cask maturation is complemented well by the red fruit and spicy notes of red wine casks.

With the Blood Oak Auchentoshan proves that a light whisky doesn’t have to be boring. It also proves that a distillery doesn’t need an idyllic pastoral location in order to create a beautiful dram.

15.5/20

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Mortlach Rare Old & Special Strength

A side by side comparison looking at the different effects of distillation and maturation.

Here we return to Mortlach, a Speyside distillery that I am fascinated with because it produces such an intriguing array of flavours in its whiskies. A few months ago I reviewed the independently-bottled Wemyss Malts ‘Ginger Glazed Gammon’ and if you want to brush up on the general information about the Mortlach distillery and its idiosyncratic distilling process you can find that here. Since that earlier post I have been lucky enough to try some additional drams from Mortlach. Moving from the independent bottlings to the official distillery bottlings, my palate has now run the gamut of the Mortlach core range all the way from the (presumably) younger NAS bottlings through to the venerable 25 year old.

mortlach lineup

In this particular review we’ll cover the two NAS offerings: the Rare Old and the Special Strength. The Rare Old is the opening gambit in the newish Mortlach range that Diageo launched in late 2014. It is bottled at 43.4% ABV, and was matured in a mix of four different types of casks: bourbon, sherry, refill bourbon and recharred barrels. The Special Strength is apparently pretty much the exact same liquid, but bottled at a higher 49% ABV and released as a Travel Retail Exclusive. Hunting down this particular bottle helped me while away some of the time during my long layover at Changi airport earlier this year! Because of the close similarities between the Rare Old and Special Strength they provide an interesting side-by-side tasting comparison. So, how exactly does this slight increase in proof impact on the profile of these whiskies?

 

Rare Old

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Nose: Butterscotch at first sniff and then a refreshing hit of menthol, opens up into honeycomb, roasted pineapples and glazed ham with burnt bits, a big hit of red apple.

Palate: Initially spicy then mellows into quite a light dram; prunes, ham steaks, wood (that hot dry wood from a sauna), tobacco and drinking cocoa.

Finish: Definitely dries out your mouth a little, still spicy (cloves, white pepper), very long, no alcohol burn, a light pleasant finish.

16/20

The Special Strength

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Nose: Vanilla custard from packet mix, dark unsweetened cocoa, then the sweetness comes through with hints of honey, orange peel, raisins, hazelnuts.

Palate: Dark cherries in syrup, cacao, pineapple, ginger spice. Surprising rounded flavours of caramelised banana and arrowroot biscuit then the typical Mortlach charred-meat characters shine through.

Finish: Honeycomb (Violet Crumble – a classic Aussie chocolate bar for those who may be overseas!) and treacle tart

15.5/20

Whilst these two bottlings are undeniably similar and both carry the signature Mortlach notes of sweetness and meatiness, the difference in proof makes them distinctly different. Whilst the Special Strength’s higher proof translates to an initially harsher mouthfeel, this difference is reflected more deeply in two whisky’s flavour profiles as well. In particular, the sweetness in the Rare Old come through more fully, whilst the spicy notes are more to the fore in the Special Strength. Taken together, they provide an interesting study in the impact the distillation has on the whisky as opposed to the cask maturation. Both are lighter and less challenging than some of the other ballsy Mortlachs out there; they definitely go down easily and make a good summer dram.

In the coming week I’ll finish off my look at the Mortlach core range with reviews of the 18 Year Old and 25 Year Old. As we approach the festive season stay tuned for more interesting drams!

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Ardbeg An Oa

The highly anticipated new edition to the Ardbeg core range!

In this review we return to Ardbeg distillery which is located on Islay’s Kildalton coast. Today’s whisky is the brand new An Oa, the first addition to the core Ardbeg range of expressions since the introduction of Corryvrecken in 2009.

The name ‘An Oa’ is a reference to the Mull of Oa which is a peninsula located nearby to the distillery. Just like this rocky and windswept part of the coast, the An Oa has the rugged oomph that one expects from a heavily peated Ardbeg dram. And yet the An Oa also displays the more approachable side of this distillery as these wild notes are tamer than in other Ardbeg core expressions.

This whisky was matured in a combination of casks including Pedro Ximénez, charred virgin oak and ex-bourbon, which were all then married together in Ardbeg’s new bespoke oak Gathering Vat by Master Distiller Bill Lumsden. In keeping with the most of the core Ardbeg range (apart from the 10 Year Old), it does not have an age statement. It is bottled at 46.6% which is lower than both the Corryvrecken and the Uigeadail.

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Nose: Typical Islay peat, Terry’s chocolate orange, smoky streaky bacon grease, a touch of lemon. Then there is an oak note and a hint of vanilla.

Palate: A sweet and creamy dram. Peat at the fore, dark chocolate and liquorice.  It mellows into buttery banana bread, honey, vanilla and stewed peaches. There is a little Christmas spice, flavours of nutmeg and cinnamon and cloves. The palate becomes a little dry towards the finish.

Finish: Seductively long. Still quite sweet but with a slight tang of resinous pine and an excellent, warming mouthfeel.

an oaOverall, a very drinkable dram and a good addition to an already strong core range. You will start by intending to have just a single splash in the evening and will soon find that a good part of you bottle has gone. Initially I did think that the An Oa was a little one-dimensional but this notion was dispelled as I discovered more to it over time. Whilst it is not as intense in peat or proof as the Uigeadail or Corryvrecken, the An Oa’s more relaxed profile makes for easier drinking for Islay whisky lovers here in Australia as we have now begun to enter the (very warm) Australian summer season.

16/20

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Have a look at my review of the Ardbeg Kelpie.

Kilchoman Tasting

Core range and the newly bottled Australian Cask Exclusive. The ‘barley to bottle’ ethos works a treat!

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Kilchoman is the youngest distillery on Islay. Established in 2005, it was the first new distillery to be built on Islay for 125 years. Kilchoman is a family-run affair and relies on a strong ‘barley to bottle’ ethos. It is one of a very small number of Scottish distilleries to grow the majority of their own barley, run their own floor maltings (a production step now largely outsourced) and even bottle on-site. To say they are passionate about their whisky is an understatement.

Earlier this year a Kilchoman representative travelled from Islay to Australia to host a series of whisky tastings from coast to coast. In true small business style, this representative was the founder’s son, Peter Wills. When I attended one of these tastings it was quite special to hear Peter’s fascinating (and often hilarious) stories about the early and very hands-on days starting up the distillery. He recounted the fun of filling 7000 bottles using a teapot from their onsite café in the early days. Following the whirlwind Australian tour, Peter and his brother were planning to hit up the west coast of the US of A, in order to bring Kilchoman to even more lucky whisky lovers.

The Australian tasting that I attended brought back memories of the time I visited Kilchoman in 2015. I had previously tried some of their core range (and I also have a Sauternes Cask Matured 2016 hidden away for a rainy day) but I was not familiar with the distillery’s more recent releases and so the tasting was a good opportunity so see where Kilchoman is at now and where they are going in the future. Whenever you get the chance to try multiple expressions from one distillery in a single sitting – do it. It gives you a much greater appreciation of the distillery’s style and character.

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Below I have written down my impressions of the whiskies at the tasting. As it was a tasting my notes were a bit briefer than normal and based on just the one dram of each (I do find that I warm to certain whiskies when revisiting them a second or third time.)

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100% Islay 7th edition

Matured in bourbon barrels, mainly first-fill ex-Buffalo Trace. This particular edition is 7 years old and bottled at 50% ABV. There are only 12,000 bottles available a year worldwide.

Nose: barley, newmake, a little peat, lemon and strawberry.

Palate: vanilla, butterscotch, milk arrowroot biscuit.

Finish: sweet but not overpowering, very long.

Machir Bay

A mix of maturation in 90% bourbon barrels and 10% Oloroso sherry casks. Does not have an age statement but apparently is about 5 years old on average. Bottled at 46% ABV.

Nose: Lemon, citrus, pear, a little hint of sweetness and then the sherry.

Palate: Smoke, peat and fruit in perfect thirds.  Takes about five minutes to open up and when it does the peat and smoke really come to the fore.

Finish: More peatiness that overpowers anything else.

Sanaig

Made in the same way as the Machir Bay but goes into different casks, namely 70% Oloroso sherry hogsheads. Bottled at 46%.

Nose: sherry sweetness, a little citrus and some light smoke.

Palate: peppery, peat then a lighter lemon curd and toffee note comes through – definitely much richer and heavier than the Machir Bay.

Loch Gorm 2017

Their sherry cask, limited edition annual release. This is the sixth version and is a 7 year old whisky matured in sherry butts, mostly first fill. It is a yearly release, with 13,500 bottles released this year.

Nose: raisins, dark chocolate jaffa and slight smoke.

Palate: peat, dark chocolate, BBQ smoke, cinnamon and nutmeg.

Australian Exclusive Single Casks 691/11

This exclusive bottling was distilled on 11 November 2011 and bottled on 25 May 2017. It was initially matured in an ex-bourbon cask before being finished in a Pedro Ximenez sherry cask. The cask yielded 261 bottles and it is bottled at 57.5%.

Nose: buttery, cinnamon, stewed fruits and a little citrus.

Palate: raisins, dark treacle, scones with jam and cream.

So, did I have a favourite? The Loch Gorm 2017 was a standout from the core range. The dark chocolate orange on the nose and smokiness on the palate really rubs my tastebuds the right way. I was not a big fan of the Sanaig. I usually enjoy whiskies matured in Oloroso casks but the Sanaig was, to me, a little thin and one-dimensional. Perhaps it needed maturing for a bit more time? The Machir Bay and 100% Islay are both solid drams with a complex palate and a long finish.

And the Australian Exclusive Single Cask? It was a very different experience to the others. The delightful Pedro Ximenez came through strongly on the nose and heavily influenced the palate. I snapped up a bottle and I’ll happily keep sampling this one, enjoying it that little bit more for knowing what I do now about its provenance, about the people that made it and the passion they have for whisky.

Laphroaig PX Cask Triple Matured

PSA: drink more sherry!

Laphroaig PX Cask Triple Matured is an absolute joy. It was matured first in ex-bourbon hogsheads, like the Laphroaig 10 Year Old, before undergoing a second maturation in quarter casks and then a final maturation in European Oak casks that originally held Pedro Ximenez (PX). Pedro Ximenez is a naturally sweet dessert wine made from grapes with a high concentration of sugars, as a result of either being picked when they are very ripe or being dried in the sun after picking. PSA: every whisky fan should drink more sherry in order to ensure that sherry casks are available for these kinds of delicious maturations! The PX Cask is bottled at 48% ABV, does not carry an age statement and is available as a travel retail exclusive in a hefty 1 litre bottle.

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Nose: as always with Laphroaig the tang of peat is the first thing you notice, followed by a hint of raisins and the nutty almond flavours from the sherry

Palate: the peat and oak are undeniably forward but then rich, sultry flavours of port wine, dried figs, rich dark berry jam, a slightly sweet liquorice come through. The mouthfeel is oily and rich.

Finish: dry like a Spanish sherry, peat and oak linger. It is very mellow and very easy to down a dram.

Laph five casks

This is a truly excellent dram. The combination of peat smoke and rich sherry is in perfect balance. The typical Laphroaig characteristics shine through but are mellowed somewhat by the beautiful mouthfeel and sweetness of raisins and sultanas. If you are lucky enough to see a bottle on your travels then snap it up. I think fans of Laphroaig will appreciate it and those who are not as familiar with Laphroaig or Islay whiskies may find this to be a gentle, sweet introduction.

PX cask

18/20

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Have a look at my review of the 25 Year Old here