Auchentoshan Blood Oak

Light but not boring

Auchentoshan distillery is located in the Lowlands region, more specifically it lies somewhere in the gritty outskirts of Glasgow. This is not the most beautiful location; it lacks the charm of undulating green hills and gently burbling streams that surround other distilleries.

auch outside

But despite its industrial locale Auchentoshan nevertheless produces a light and very pure whisky. This is due to the triple distillation method that they employ to strip away some of the “heavier” notes from their whisky. The vast majority of Scottish distilleries just distil twice but Auchentoshan has gone down the path of triple distillation in order to create a more floral distillate that can be easily influenced by the oak during maturation.

auch stills

Ordinarily, lighter styles of whisky like this are not really my thing. I have tried a number of Auchentoshan whiskies in the past (Three Wood, American Oak, etc) and have been somewhat underwhelmed. But the Auchentoshan whisky I am reviewing today, the Blood Oak, is different. Despite Auchentoshan’s generally light character this particular whisky is intense: just bursting with juicy fruit and spice notes.

The Blood Oak is part of Auchentoshan’s Travel Retail Exclusive Range. I picked up a bottle during a stop-over in Changi Airport, Singapore, and I am glad that I did. In terms of technical information, the Blood Oak is a NAS whisky, bottled at 46% and has been matured in a combination of bourbon casks and red wine casks (hence the dramatic name). This maturation gives the whisky a very rich flavour. This is reflected in the deep red packaging of the bottle and the crimson gold colour of the whisky itself.

auch dram

Nose: Vanilla, creamed honey, citrus (blood orange and grapefruit), cloves and almond.

Palate: Juicy red fruits immediately come to the fore (plums, strawberries and summer raspberries), spicy notes of cloves and ginger, marzipan.

Palate: Peppery, long and lingering, with a little dryness at the end.

Blood Oak is the most rich, vibrant and complex of the Auchentoshan range that I have tried to date. I am enjoying the general whisky industry’s ongoing experimentation with different cask maturations/finishes and Auchentoshan’s combination of red wine and bourbon casks here is particularly well-matched. The sweet and vanilla flavours characteristic of bourbon cask maturation is complemented well by the red fruit and spicy notes of red wine casks.

With the Blood Oak Auchentoshan proves that a light whisky doesn’t have to be boring. It also proves that a distillery doesn’t need an idyllic pastoral location in order to create a beautiful dram.

15.5/20

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Mortlach Rare Old & Special Strength

A side by side comparison looking at the different effects of distillation and maturation.

Here we return to Mortlach, a Speyside distillery that I am fascinated with because it produces such an intriguing array of flavours in its whiskies. A few months ago I reviewed the independently-bottled Wemyss Malts ‘Ginger Glazed Gammon’ and if you want to brush up on the general information about the Mortlach distillery and its idiosyncratic distilling process you can find that here. Since that earlier post I have been lucky enough to try some additional drams from Mortlach. Moving from the independent bottlings to the official distillery bottlings, my palate has now run the gamut of the Mortlach core range all the way from the (presumably) younger NAS bottlings through to the venerable 25 year old.

mortlach lineup

In this particular review we’ll cover the two NAS offerings: the Rare Old and the Special Strength. The Rare Old is the opening gambit in the newish Mortlach range that Diageo launched in late 2014. It is bottled at 43.4% ABV, and was matured in a mix of four different types of casks: bourbon, sherry, refill bourbon and recharred barrels. The Special Strength is apparently pretty much the exact same liquid, but bottled at a higher 49% ABV and released as a Travel Retail Exclusive. Hunting down this particular bottle helped me while away some of the time during my long layover at Changi airport earlier this year! Because of the close similarities between the Rare Old and Special Strength they provide an interesting side-by-side tasting comparison. So, how exactly does this slight increase in proof impact on the profile of these whiskies?

 

Rare Old

rare old

Nose: Butterscotch at first sniff and then a refreshing hit of menthol, opens up into honeycomb, roasted pineapples and glazed ham with burnt bits, a big hit of red apple.

Palate: Initially spicy then mellows into quite a light dram; prunes, ham steaks, wood (that hot dry wood from a sauna), tobacco and drinking cocoa.

Finish: Definitely dries out your mouth a little, still spicy (cloves, white pepper), very long, no alcohol burn, a light pleasant finish.

16/20

The Special Strength

special-strength.jpg

Nose: Vanilla custard from packet mix, dark unsweetened cocoa, then the sweetness comes through with hints of honey, orange peel, raisins, hazelnuts.

Palate: Dark cherries in syrup, cacao, pineapple, ginger spice. Surprising rounded flavours of caramelised banana and arrowroot biscuit then the typical Mortlach charred-meat characters shine through.

Finish: Honeycomb (Violet Crumble – a classic Aussie chocolate bar for those who may be overseas!) and treacle tart

15.5/20

Whilst these two bottlings are undeniably similar and both carry the signature Mortlach notes of sweetness and meatiness, the difference in proof makes them distinctly different. Whilst the Special Strength’s higher proof translates to an initially harsher mouthfeel, this difference is reflected more deeply in two whisky’s flavour profiles as well. In particular, the sweetness in the Rare Old come through more fully, whilst the spicy notes are more to the fore in the Special Strength. Taken together, they provide an interesting study in the impact the distillation has on the whisky as opposed to the cask maturation. Both are lighter and less challenging than some of the other ballsy Mortlachs out there; they definitely go down easily and make a good summer dram.

In the coming week I’ll finish off my look at the Mortlach core range with reviews of the 18 Year Old and 25 Year Old. As we approach the festive season stay tuned for more interesting drams!

Check out the A Cheeky Dram scoring system here!